October 21, 2020, 5:04 am

Articles - Maintenance Management

Planning and Scheduling – Getting the basics right

Written by Gemma Ivers.   

As a trainer I’m sometimes surprised by the answers to two simple questions from skilled personnel from planning and scheduling departments attending Planning and Scheduling training.

The first being, “What is Planning?”.
And the second, “What is Scheduling?”.

In most cases people get the gist of the concept correct, but there are always a few who muddle or confuse the two concepts.

One reason could be that the difference in the two concepts has never been explained or because people do not see it as two separate concepts. Another reason for this could be where one person is responsible for both these functions without having a clear understanding of the boundaries of each. “It’s the planner’s job, right?”

Do not get me wrong, the planning and scheduling function could be performed by the same person, but only if they understand the differences in the processes and when they should be wearing which hat – planning or scheduling.

 

 

We Optimised our Preventive Maintenance without realising it

Written by Gemma Ivers.   

 It is sometimes interesting to reflect on our own exposure to maintenance when it is overlaid with current thinking and methodologies for best practice maintenance.

In the 1990’s, off highway dump trucks were serviced every 250 hours. This would involve bringing the truck into the workshop for about a shift. We would change the engine oil and carry out other OEM recommended tasks. On top of this we would have carried out a host of other inspections and checks. These would cover everything from hose inspections and electrical checks to our own bespoke checks that had been implemented over a period of time.

Fast forward to the current day and we service our trucks at 500 hour intervals. This has been facilitated by the extension of the oil change interval from 250 hours to 500 hours. So now, instead of the trucks coming into the workshop every 250 hours for a service and the associated inspection, they come in every 500 hours.

So, what has happened to all the inspections and maintenance tasks that were being carried out every 250 hours in the 1990’s? How have we saved a shift of downtime every 250 operating hours? Did we not need to be doing all those checks every 250 hours? In a crude sense, what most of us did was implement the results of a PMO study without realising it.

 

How to Prioritise Maintenance Work Orders?

Written by Sandy Dunn.   

 I have recently received a question from one of our newsletter subscribers.  He writes:

“Firstly, I want to say, I really enjoy reading your articles and enjoy building the knowledge that those articles bring.

My role has transitioned from maintenance supervisor to maintenance planner. In my new role, I have the responsibility of reducing the outstanding work orders in our CMMS whilst prioritising the new work orders being generated.

What are some guidelines I can use for prioritizing work orders to be able to do the correct work now? The old system relied on personnel entering their work orders into the system and prioritizing the WOs as they see fit. This is not realistic as everyone sees their WOs as [highest] priority.”

This is a great question, and one that this article will attempt to answer.

 

Industry Lessons Learned in Maintenance Planning & Scheduling - Planning Pitfalls

Written by Jeff Stone.   

This is the third of our three articles on Maintenance Planning and Scheduling – are we learning the industry lessons? Out first article explored “The Big Picture’’ and examined challenges associate with the overall process, people and capability issues, master data and key performance indicators. Our second article delved into the challenges we observe with the scheduling process.

The other articles in this series are:  

In this final article in the series, we explore the planning process and five of the common improvement opportunities we observe within the planning process:

  1. Quality of the relationship with supply department
  2. Feedback on the quality of planned work
  3. Use of Corrective Task Lists/Standard Jobs
  4. Planner focussed on future work
  5. Stakeholder engagement
 

Industry Lessons Learned in Maintenance Planning & Scheduling - Scheduling Pitfalls

Written by Jeff Stone.   

In the first article in this series on Maintenance Planning and Scheduling, we explored some of the “Big Picture” issues associated with the Planning and Scheduling process, people and capability to support the process, master data and KPIs.

The other articles in this series are:  

In this second article in our series, we will dive a little deeper and explore in more depth, five of the common issues that affect the Scheduling process, namely:

  1. Rework due to unplanned work being passed to Scheduler
  2. Capacity Management
  3. Priority of work
  4. Scheduler becomes a slave to the system
  5. KPI’s Driving wrong behaviour
 

Industry Lessons Learned in Maintenance Planning & Scheduling - “The Big Picture”

Written by Jeff Stone.   

Most organisations that carry out equipment maintenance have some sort of Planning and Scheduling process in place, ranging from a basic manual card system to an advanced Computerised Maintenance Management System such as SAP, Pronto or Maximo.

This is the first in a series of 3 articles, where we will explore the “Big Picture” systemic issues associated with the overall maintenance Planning and Scheduling process. The other articles in this series are: 

  • Industry Lessons Learned in Maintenance Planning & Scheduling - “ The Big Picture” (this article)
  • Industry Lessons Learned in Maintenance Planning & Scheduling - Scheduling Pitfalls (to come)
  • Industry Lessons Learned in Maintenance Planning & Scheduling - Planning Pitfalls (to come)
 

5 Tips for a Better Asset Register

Written by Sandy Dunn.   

An organisation’s asset register is the foundation on which its Asset Information systems are built.  Dodgy foundations mean a rickety building.  Here are 5 tips to make sure your Asset Register is rock solid. 

 

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