April 25, 2019, 9:48 am

  • Increasingly in our lives both at home and in our workplace we are utilising the capabilities available of new Commercial Off-The-Shelf (COTS) technology that manifests itself in electronic assets we own and use. Think about all the electronic assets that you own; a smartphone, iPad, laptop, flat screen TV etc. Take any one of these, say your smartphone, and ask yourself ‘what maintenance can I do to prevent the phone from failing and maximising its useful life’. The answer is not much really. When it fails…we accept that it fails.

  • There is often confusion amongst those new to Maintenance and Reliability regarding the difference between Availability and Reliability. This article discusses the difference between the two, and also considers the relative importance of each when setting goals and targets for operational improvement.

  • Can you make sense of your asset related data? Can you use this data to optimise your business? Can you connect data from the various asset related systems that you use to gain new insights and wisdom?

    At Assetivity, we often work with clients to help build out asset strategy and related data into their Asset Performance Management (APM) systems by teasing apart and making sense of their Enterprise Asset Management (EAM) data. This process provides a real insight into the completeness and usefulness of EAM data.

    In our experience, when building out the APM data, integrating data from the EAM system is not always smooth sailing. Challenges that are often encountered include...

    Read the full article

  •  I have recently received a question from one of our newsletter subscribers.  He writes:

    “Firstly, I want to say, I really enjoy reading your articles and enjoy building the knowledge that those articles bring.

    My role has transitioned from maintenance supervisor to maintenance planner. In my new role, I have the responsibility of reducing the outstanding work orders in our CMMS whilst prioritising the new work orders being generated.

    What are some guidelines I can use for prioritizing work orders to be able to do the correct work now? The old system relied on personnel entering their work orders into the system and prioritizing the WOs as they see fit. This is not realistic as everyone sees their WOs as [highest] priority.”

    This is a great question, and one that this article will attempt to answer.

  • This is the third of our three articles on Maintenance Planning and Scheduling – are we learning the industry lessons? Out first article explored “The Big Picture’’ and examined challenges associate with the overall process, people and capability issues, master data and key performance indicators. Our second article delved into the challenges we observe with the scheduling process.

    The other articles in this series are:  

    In this final article in the series, we explore the planning process and five of the common improvement opportunities we observe within the planning process:

    1. Quality of the relationship with supply department
    2. Feedback on the quality of planned work
    3. Use of Corrective Task Lists/Standard Jobs
    4. Planner focussed on future work
    5. Stakeholder engagement
  • This is the third of our three articles on Maintenance Planning and Scheduling – are we learning the industry lessons? Out first article explored “The Big Picture’’ and examined challenges associate with the overall process, people and capability issues, master data and key performance indicators. Our second article delved into the challenges we observe with the scheduling process.

    The other articles in this series are:  

    In this final article in the series, we explore the planning process and five of the common improvement opportunities we observe within the planning process:

    1. Quality of the relationship with supply department
    2. Feedback on the quality of planned work
    3. Use of Corrective Task Lists/Standard Jobs
    4. Planner focussed on future work
    5. Stakeholder engagement

    Read the full article

  • In the first article in this series on Maintenance Planning and Scheduling, we explored some of the “Big Picture” issues associated with the Planning and Scheduling process, people and capability to support the process, master data and KPIs.

    The other articles in this series are:  

    In this second article in our series, we will dive a little deeper and explore in more depth, five of the common issues that affect the Scheduling process, namely:

    1. Rework due to unplanned work being passed to Scheduler
    2. Capacity Management
    3. Priority of work
    4. Scheduler becomes a slave to the system
    5. KPI’s Driving wrong behaviour
  • In the first article in this series on Maintenance Planning and Scheduling, we explored some of the “Big Picture” issues associated with the Planning and Scheduling process, people and capability to support the process, master data and KPIs.

    The other articles in this series are:  

    In this second article in our series, we will dive a little deeper and explore in more depth, five of the common issues that affect the Scheduling process, namely:

    1. Rework due to unplanned work being passed to Scheduler
    2. Capacity Management
    3. Priority of work
    4. Scheduler becomes a slave to the system
    5. KPI’s Driving wrong behaviour

    Read the full article

  • This short video introduces the concept of the PF Interval - one of the core principles that underpins Reliability Centred Maintenance and Preventive Maintenance Program development.

  • 56e80809 3bce 4c06 ad03 ec9978ab5b1b largeWe, as Asset Management professionals, work with classified plant and equipment on a day-to-day basis, but are often not confident that we have accurately identified our classified plant or fully understand our obligations at each stage in the asset lifecycle.

    This article discusses the key activities associated with the acquisition, operation, maintenance and disposal of classified plant and equipment. Let’s start by understanding why classified plant needs special attention.

  • Often, we see organisations embark on large-scale Preventive Maintenance program improvement projects (and sometimes even finish them!) using Reliability Centred Maintenance (RCM) or PM Optimisation (PMO) processes, and then ignore their ongoing refinement for several years (or more).

  • There is often confusion amongst those new to Maintenance and Reliability regarding the difference between Availability and Reliability. This article discusses the difference between the two, and also considers the relative importance of each when setting goals and targets for operational improvement.

    Definitions

    Let’s start with some basic definitions...

    Read the full article.

  •  I have recently received a question from one of our newsletter subscribers.  He writes:

    “Firstly, I want to say, I really enjoy reading your articles and enjoy building the knowledge that those articles bring.

    My role has transitioned from maintenance supervisor to maintenance planner. In my new role, I have the responsibility of reducing the outstanding work orders in our CMMS whilst prioritising the new work orders being generated.

    What are some guidelines I can use for prioritizing work orders to be able to do the correct work now? The old system relied on personnel entering their work orders into the system and prioritizing the WOs as they see fit. This is not realistic as everyone sees their WOs as [highest] priority.”

    This is a great question, and one that this article will attempt to answer.

    Read the full article.

  • This short video introduces the concept of the PF Interval - one of the core principles that underpins Reliability Centred Maintenance and Preventive Maintenance Program development.

  • Given that Assetivity’s business model is all about delivering value to our clients through improvements in asset management, maintenance management and reliability engineering, it is not surprising that we are often asked how best to put a value on maintenance and reliability improvements project.

    The answer of course is ‘that depends on the nature of the project’.

    In this article, we will consider the three levers of value in any maintenance and reliability improvement project, explore five approaches that we commonly apply to estimate the likely value from the improvement projects, and discuss methods for measuring and monitoring whether the project is actually delivering on its promise.

  • In previous articles, we have described "What is Reliability Centred Maintenance (RCM)?" and "What is Preventive Maintenance Optimisation (PMO)?". In this article, we will discuss the similarities and differences between the two, and make some recommendations regarding which approach may be most appropriate for Preventive Maintenance program development, and the circumstances under which that may apply.

  • Written by: Sandy Dunn - Managing Director, Assetivity | November 5, 2018

    Why we need to move beyond point solutions to a more strategic & holistic approach

    Last week I attended the IMARC conference in Melbourne which is Australia’s largest Mining conference.  With four streams over three days, a stellar speaker line-up of senior executives from mining companies and suppliers to the industry and a large trade-show, it was a great opportunity to hear and learn about the latest industry trends.  While the conference was industry-specific, I believe that the messages and trends are mostly universal.

    The key messages that I got from the conference (with a focus on Asset Management and Operations Improvement, which is clearly the area of most relevance to Assetivity and our clients) were:

    • The industry needs to reimagine itself if it wishes to gain greater community acceptance and be recognised as an industry that people want to work in. To some extent this is already happening, but more on that later.
    • New technologies are fundamentally changing the way that the industry operates. While automation is grabbing the headlines (driverless haul trucks, autonomous trains), a raft of new technologies is changing back-office functions and enabling greater control, faster feedback on performance and better-quality outcomes.
    • The old, ponderous, slow-moving ways of the mining industry of the past need to (and are) changing. Agility and speed in deployment of new technologies is vital. And these technologies can often be deployed without the need for major capital expenditure.
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